A normal life…for now

It’s been a real treat having my tugboat captain home! He’s been here almost a month and we’re settling into our familiar routines. I know that any minute his cell’s gonna ring and he’ll be flying off to another assignment, but for now, I’m really enjoying the normal-ness of having him around.

Right before he gets here, I go through all the stress of getting me and the house ready, baking his favorites, and all that welcome home stuff.

When he arrives, there’s always an adjustment period–at least for me–retraining myself to keep the bathroom door closed, dealing with his mounds of laundry, and learning to share the bed. The grocery bill goes up about a thousand percent–it seems like he thinks he needs to eat EVERY SINGLE DAY-what’s up with that?

We like to read together, either in front of the fire or before going to sleep. I think that’s probably some of the most special and restoring times of all. It’s such a pleasure to read a few pages, look up, quietly make eye contact and smile, and resume reading.

When my son and DIL are here, and it’s quiet except for the turning of pages and perhaps a chuckle or two, I look around the family room and see all of the heads bowed over books–it’s some of my happiest family times.

The book hubs is currently reading is The Way Out by Craig Childs. He previously read The True Story of Water, a gift from my son. Craig Childs is a naturalist, adventurer, and desert ecologist. In this intensely dramatic narrative–the record of a perilous excursion into the wild–two men confront immutable forces of nature and the limits of their own sanity. Childs is lost. In a labyrinth of canyons in the American Southwest where virtually nothing else is alive– barely any vegetation, few signs of wildlife, scant traces of any human precursors in this landscape–Childs and his friend undertake a journey. With as much food and gear as they can carry, and little else but their wiles to help them traverse the inhospitable, unmappable terrain, the two men assume the life-or-death challenge of exploring this land–and then finding a way out. Equally gripping as their adventure in the wild is the parallel story, told in flashback, of what propelled the two men into these extreme circumstances.

I’m reading an exquisite novel, The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery, a bestseller in France. I’ve only just started it, and I’m still at the stage of being introduced to the characters so I don’t really have a grasp about what’s going on, but I’m getting pulled into the story, and that’s always a good thing. Has anyone else read this? It’s been out for a few years.

Finishing up the tugboat man’s interview–thank you for your questions–and a post about  grumpy old men.