“Selfie”: TV Review

MV5BMTc0MzgwMjc1MV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNjExMTE5MjE@._V1_SX214_AL_“Having haters online means that you made it!”

“But having haters in real life means people hate you.”

“Selfie”.

How could I NOT be intrigued?

I’m not a professional reviewer. I’m not on staff of a newspaper (do they even exist anymore?) —  I don’t write for a trade publication like Variety, I don’t have a horse in the race, so to speak.

Simply put, I watch a little television from time to time.

I’m a VIEWER, not a REviewer. 

Some of my all time favorite shows are outside my demographics; for instance, I LOVE LOVE LOVED Gossip Girl and mourned the day the series ended.

Oh Blair! Oh, Chuck! Oh, Serena! Oh, Dan!

And I like(d) New Girl, but now I’m almost — but not quite– over it. Except for Schmidt. LOVE him!!

Love Sherlock; watch Downton Abbey but sometimes it’s a snoozefest.

I’m not enamored of the “vampire” genre, nor do I enjoy crime or hospital dramaz. Too much blood and guts, not enough sex and snark.

The only reason my opinions are made public is that I’m a BLOGGER.

Bloggers are inherently self-absorbed and narcissistic, don’t you agree?

Here we are, as a whole, writing down our thoughts and observations and sharing various parts of our lives and putting it all OUT THERE for the world to see and appreciate —  IF we’re doing it right.

See how it always circles back to being about me? See what I’m saying?

I’ve strayed a bit off-topic…

The teasers for Selfie were so adorable, I hoped the show would live up to the preview, and for me, it has.

Created and executive produced by Emily Kapnek for Warner Bros. Television stars Karen Gillan as Eliza Dooley and John Cho as Henry Higgs. P.S. Karen Gillan is AMAZING.

From the website: 

“Social Media superstar Eliza Dooley (Karen Gillan) has 263,000 followers who hang on to her every post, tweet and selfie. But after a workplace mishap goes viral, she quickly realizes that being “instafamous” isn’t all it’s cracked up to be and being friended is not the same as having actual friends.

She enlists co-worker and marketing guru, Henry (John Cho), to ‘rebrand’ her self-obsessed reputation and teach her how to connect with people in the real world.

At first, Henry wants nothing to do with Eliza, who is the epitome of all he deems wrong with the app-addicted world.

But soon, Henry takes pity on her.

What Henry doesn’t anticipate, however, is how much he’ll learn.  As a workaholic who rarely makes time for socializing,  Henry eventually begins to realize that his little “project” just might have something to teach him. After all, keeping life at arm’s length is great for taking a selfie, but not so much if you want someone in the picture next to you.”

I’m hooked on the snappy wit and often seriously funny dialogue.

It’s so refreshing to discover a TV show that is NOT a retread of an old idea — CSI ad nauseum. Not a fan, soz.

The situational humor is for the most part believable, not clichéd nor contrived nor forced.

Might Selfie be ahead of its time?

It’s possible that some of us aren’t quite ready to hold that mirror up to ourselves and examine certain behaviors, but I’m a fan.

Selfie: As a society, we have become so connected to our technological devices that we’ve become DISconnected to human interaction and communication.

This is true.

Hey here’s me — a blogger — using several social media platforms to share my opinion about a TV show that conveys an important message in a gently mocking way.

 DO YOU GET IT?

Yeah, it’s a fairly overt reference to Pygmalion  and My Fair Lady — with the proper guidance, anyone can be a lady, only in this case, Henry is determined to teach Eliza how to interact as a human, not as a hashtag.

It’s truly a twist with a modern POV.

In fact, it happens to me IRL (in real life) on a daily basis.

  • In the line at the gym waiting for the next class to start, whether it’s Yoga, Pilates, PiYo, Boot Camp, or Shadowboxing – no one TALKS any more. NO ONE. Everyone stands there, cocooned in their own little world, and doing what? Scrolling through FB push notifications? Texting whom? About what?
  • And here on my flight to SF, sitting next to me is a woman about my age, (with a really superb specimen of a large carryon Louis Vuitton travel bag btw) head down, no eye contact, scrolling away on her smart phone
  • Across from me is another woman playing Solitaire on her phone, and next to her is a guy watching a movie.

All around me is dead silence except for the tap-tap-tap of the keyboard.

Wait, that’s me, haha. I’m isolated too, observing and writing it all down.

It’s eerily quiet. No chit chat, no verbal communication but for an occasional “excuse me” to go to the bathroom.

Selfie is a cautionary tale told with humor and insight.

I give Selfie five Louboutins out of five. LOVE it!louboutin

 

 

Gallimaufry. What’s That? Today’s Confused Hodgepodge.

Gal·li·mau·fry  [gal-uhmaw-free]
…a hodgepodge; jumble; confused medley.

That’s today’s title and a great descriptor…a little bit of everything ‘cos, well, just because.
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Update on my son...

Staples removed (20+ of them!!) thanks to my good friend’s doctor hub whom we’ve known since our boys were in first grade and we used to go to aerobics classes together…he’s a topnotch internist at North County Internal Medicine.

A while back they added something special to his practice, NCIM Aesthetics — specializing in state-of-the-art laser skin laser technology PLUS my personal favorites: Botox, Juvederm, and Radiesse. Give ’em a call @ 760-726-2302 or email NCIMaesthetics@gmail.com

So far, the only hitch in Angel Boy’s recovery was a by-product of taking Augmentin for an infection he got in the hospital…another really awful stomach bacteria called c. difficile, but with a switch to Flagyl and some high quality probiotics, his fever and the infection disappeared. He’s finishing up his recovery in SF with DIL. Alll he needs to do now is build up his strength and gain back the nearly twenty pounds he lost over the last month.

Me (‘cos it’s always about me, right? I mean, even when it doesn’t seem to be all about me, it’s really ALL ABOUT ME.)

Suffering from writer’s block again, so I’m watching back to back episodes of Say Yes to the Dress, Real Housewives of Orange County (or New York), and Sherlock —  all very successfully helping me NOT create a post — or writing — of any value. There’s no real writing inspiration, just escapism.

Honestly, I don’t know who I’m crushing on more: Randy Fenoli from SYTTD (I’d kill for his eyebrows) or Benedict Cumberbatch as the ultimate Sherlock. I love them both! But not nearly as much as I’m lady boning for Richard Roxburgh as criminal lawyer Cleaver Greene in Rake, (the original Aussie one), not the US version, on Netflix.

Watching SYTTD and Housewives is something I can ONLY do when my tugboat man is out to sea; it’s one of those pesky non-negotiables when he’s home.

He literally REFUSES — says, “Im outta here” as he leaves the room, so I save them as my guilty pleasures when he’s thousands of miles away.

A successful marriage is all about compromises, right? Do I want to have a fight about a stupid TV show? Nope, not this Princess.

With my very empty nest, it was time to put on my comfortable shoes and flex my weakened shopping muscles. It’s been a long time since I’ve spent the day as a little retail butterfly, flitting from one store to the next, checking out the offerings and laying down the “plastique”; I’m a bit rusty and needed a warm-up before attempting one of the big malls or my own personal mecca, South Coast Plaza.

After a great hour-long boot camp class at 24 Hour Fitness, I checked my watch, 10:00 a.m. and I was off! First to Target for essentials, then Trader Joe’s and a vacuum store for a new powerhead belt, on to Marshalls to test my shoe-spotting and ability to browse both-sides-of-the-aisle-at-the-same-time skills.

After the one hour mark, I was a bit tired and thirsty so I stopped to eat an apple and grab a bottle of water — it’s imperative to stay well-hydrated and nourished whilst shopping.

Revived, I meandered downtown to get my glasses adjusted and stopped at my favorite consignment shop where I’ve previously discovered Valentino and Missoni treasures –not so lucky on this day, but I didn’t leave empty handed; there was a sweet and comfy chartreuse bathing suit coverup  that called out to me.

This practice shopping excursion ended with a visit to Lowe’s for vegetable seeds, a pomegranate tree, and mesh to cover an apple tree that’s being eaten by nasty ground squirrels, presumably cousins of the elusive Spirit Squirrel™.
Click here to read all about it.

Still all about me, but on a serious note…

I was just diagnosed with vitreous detachment in my left eye which is sad because I thought the sparkles I was seeing was once-and-for-all proof positive of my Princess-ness.

However, I was wrong. Here’s the info from NIH (National Institutes of Health) in case you ever see sparkles and it’s not the optical or silent migraine type of lights.

It’s definitely NOT something to ignore…

What is vitreous detachment?
Most of the eye’s interior is filled with vitreous, a gel-like substance that helps the eye maintain a round shape. There are millions of fine fibers intertwined within the vitreous that are attached to the surface of the retina, the eye’s light-sensitive tissue. As we age, the vitreous slowly shrinks, and these fine fibers pull on the retinal surface. Usually the fibers break, allowing the vitreous to separate and shrink from the retina.

In most cases, a vitreous detachment, also known as a posterior vitreous detachment, is not sight-threatening and requires no treatment.

Who is at risk for vitreous detachment?
A vitreous detachment is a common condition that usually affects people over age 50, and is very common after age 80. People who are nearsighted are also at increased risk. Those who have a vitreous detachment in one eye are likely to have one in the other, although it may not happen until years later.

Symptoms and Detection
As the vitreous shrinks, it becomes somewhat stringy, and the strands can cast tiny shadows on the retina that you may notice as floaters, which appear as little “cobwebs” or specks that seem to float about in your field of vision. If you try to look at these shadows they appear to quickly dart out of the way.

One symptom of a vitreous detachment is a small but sudden increase in the number of new floaters. This increase in floaters may be accompanied by flashes of light (lightning streaks) in your peripheral, or side, vision. In most cases, either you will not notice a vitreous detachment, or you will find it merely annoying because of the increase in floaters.

Treatment
How does vitreous detachment affect vision?

Although a vitreous detachment does not threaten sight, once in a while some of the vitreous fibers pull so hard on the retina that they create a macular hole or lead to a retinal detachment.

Both of these conditions are sight-threatening and should be treated immediately.

If left untreated, a macular hole or detached retina can lead to permanent vision loss in the affected eye. Those who experience a sudden increase in floaters or an increase in flashes of light in peripheral vision should have an eye care professional examine their eyes as soon as possible.

But enough of THAT stuff, right?

On that happy note, I’ll wrap up this Wednesday gallimaufry and try to focus on a submission for Erma Bombeck Workshop all because I opened my big mouth on Twitter and kinda sorta got dared to do it. SCARED! Wish me luck, y’all!

ermabombeck